AA friends

    Weekly AA meetings are held Saturdays at 8am and 8pm EST
 
  
(1 pm Saturday and 1 am Sunday GMT ) in the meeting room.

AA MEETING STRUCTURE  (Post # 6 (1-6) when a newcomer is present.)


1. Meeting needs to be in a quiet uninterrupted room at fixed times.

2. Welcome - Chairperson starts the meeting on time by giving a welcome like "I am Bob, an alcoholic. I would like to welcome you to the Saturday evening  meeting. We would like to give a special welcome to new attendees and have you introduce yourselves".

3. "Preamble" read by chairperson

4. Chairperson asks that a member or members read the "How It Works" from the "Alcoholics Anonymous" book.

5. The "12 Traditions" are read by a member or members.

6. The AA / SUPPORT GROUP GUIDELINES may be reviewed if new people are present. (The group may refer to a posted chart)

1) KEEP CONFIDENTIALITY - "What you hear here stays here"

2) MAKE "I STATEMENTS" - Avoid using "you" or "we"

3) STAY IN THE "HERE AND NOW" - Share what you are dealing with today or this week.

4) SHARE FEELINGS about your experience, strength, and hope.

5) NO FIXING - NO ADVICE GIVING

6) NO CROSSTALK - No asking of questions or discussion

7. The chairperson may suggest a topic or step to share on at the meeting. Each time someone shares they will begin by first saying " I am Bob, I am an alcoholic". The group will then respond by saying "Hi Bob". After someone finishes sharing the group will respond with "Thanks, Bob". This builds respect.

8. When it is time for the meeting to close the chairperson will ask the attendees for someone to chair the next meeting. Then he will ask all to read the "Serenity Prayer" 

"God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I can not change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference"

At the end of the prayer they may say "keep coming back it works if you work it".

9. The meeting is now over. The attendees may stay and have informal discussion or ask questions of one another before leaving.



AA MEETING SCRIPT


Opening:

      
   
     

Alcoholics Anonymous is a worldwide fellowship of men and women who help each other to stay sober.  This is a closed meeting, you are welcome to stay if you have a desire to quit drinking.  If you have had a drink in the last 24 hours, we ask that you only listen during the meeting.

Hello, my name is          .  I'm an alcoholic.


We will now read the Preamble.


AA PREAMBLE

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. A.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

Serenity Prayer
Let us open the meeting with a moment of silence to do with as you wish, followed by the Serenity Prayer.

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Introductions:


Is there anyone who is here for their first AA meeting? Please introduce yourself  by your first name and please say you're an alcoholic, or
have a problem with alcohol, or think you might have a problem?

Are there any visitors from another fellowship, city, or country?


Welcome!


We will now introduce ourselves by our first name only, for example, 

'I am Bill, an alcoholic.' Group may then responds with 'Hi Bill'.


Reading:

We will now begin by reading the 'How It Works' from chapter 5 of the Alcoholics Anonymous book. Please read a paragraph or step at a time until the reading is finished.


How it Works -
    

  Rarely have we seen a person fail who has thoroughly followed our path. Those who do not recover are people who cannot or will not completely give themselves to this simple program, usually men and women who are

constitutionally incapable of being honest with themselves. There are such unfortunates. They are not at fault; they seem to have been born that way. They are naturally incapable of grasping and developing a manner of living

which demands rigorous honesty. Their chances are less than average. There are those too, who suffer from grave emotional and mental disorders, but many of them do recover if they have the capacity to be honest. 

     

Our stories disclose in a general way what we used to be like, what happened, and what we are like now. If you have decided you want what we have and are willing to go to any length to get it - then you are ready to take certain steps.

At some of these we balked. We thought we could find an easier softer way. But we could not. With all the earnestness at our command, we beg of you to be fearless and thorough from the very start. Some of us have tried to hold on to our old ideas

and the result was nil until we let go absolutely. Remember that we deal with alcohol - cunning, baffling, powerful! Without help it is too much for us. But there is One who has all power- that one is God. May you find Him now!


         Half measures availed us nothing. We stood at the turning point. We asked His protection and care with complete abandon. Here are the steps we took, which are suggested as a program of recovery:


1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol--that our lives had become unmanageable.

2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

9. Made direct amends to such people whereever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs. 


       Many of us exclaimed, "What an order I can't go through with it." Do not be discouraged. No one among us has been able to maintain anything like perfect adherence to these principles. We are not saints. 

       'WHAT'S THE POINT?"

The point is, that we are willing to grow along spiritual lines. The principles we have set down are guides to progress. We claim spiritual progress rather than spiritual perfection.

Our description of the alcoholic, the chapter to the agnostic, and our personal adventures before and after make clear three pertinent ideas:

(a) That we were alcoholic and could not manage our own lives.
(b) That probably no human power could have relieved our alcoholism.
(c) That God could and would if He were sought.

from: ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS(The Big Book) The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered From Alcoholism - Third Edition - New York, 1976. Chapter 5. Page 58 -60.


The Twelve Traditions (optional)


"We will now read the Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous."


THE TWELVE TRADITIONS

Our AA experience has taught us that:

1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon AA unity.

2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority - a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.

3. The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking.

4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or AA as a whole.

5. Each group has but one primary purpose - to carry the message to the alcoholic who still suffers.

6. An AA group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the AA name to any related facility or outside enterprise, less problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.

7. Every AA group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.

8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.

9. AA as such ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.

10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues;hence the AA name ought never be drawn into public controversy.

11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.

12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.


from: ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS(The Big Book) The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered From Alcoholism - Third Edition - New York, 1976. Page 564


Sharing: 


1.  If you have a desire to share, please raise your hand by typing “!” (the exclamation point) in the main chat screen. As chairperson I will keep track of all who wish to share and you will be called upon in order.  Whenever you are finished sharing, type "finished".

2.  To protect your anonymity, we respectfully request that no personal information be posted in the main screens.

3.  We ask that you limit your sharing to 3-5 minutes, in order that all may have the opportunity to share. There is to be no crosstalk or interruptions. In general, we share our experience, strength, and hope - as we briefly say 'what it was like, what happened, and what it is like now'. Share feelings, using 'I statements' (rather than 'you statements')." The meeting is now open for discussion on a topic (or readings).


 State or ask for topic/s

  

Would anyone like to recommend a topic?   I will accept 1-3 AA related topics.


The topic for today's meeting is..             or             The topics for today's meeting are..


Closing:


Who would like to read "The Promises"?


AA PROMISES

1. We are going to know a new freedom and a new happiness.

2. We will not regret the past nor wish to shut the door on it.

3/4. We will comprehend the word serenity and we will know peace.

5. No matter how far down the scale we have gone, we will see how our experience can benefit others.

6. That feeling of uselessness and self-pity will disappear.

7. We will lose interest in selfish things and gain interest in our fellows

8. Self-seeking will slip away.

9. Our whole attitude and outlook upon life will change

10. Fear of people and of economic insecurity will leave us.

11. We will intuitively know how to handle situations which used to baffle us.

12. We will suddenly realize that God is doing for us what we could not do for ourselves.


From Alcoholics Anonymous(The Big Book) - The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered from Alcoholism Third Edition / New York City, 1976. Page 83-84. 


Are these extravagant promises? We think not. They are being fulfilled among us - sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. They will materialize if we work for them.


(optional)

We want to thank...      for setting up the room, and...     for greeting.


Announcements: 


There are two meetings here every Saturday at 8 am and 8 pm EST 

Please keep coming back. 


Is someone willing to chair the next meeting?   Please speak to the chairperson to schedule a week in advance.


Are there any AA related announcements?  You may announce time and place of other AA meetings.


We thank...  for sharing , if you were not able to share, please share with someone after the meeting.


Please remember:

Who you see here, what you read here, when you leave here, let it stay here.


We will now close with a moment of silence to do with as you wish followed by the Lords Prayer.


Our Father, Who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day, our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil, for Thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever and ever.  Amen


Keep coming back.  It works if you work it !


The meeting is now over. The attendees may stay and have informal discussion or ask questions of one another before leaving.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~#~~#~~#~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Readings


AA PREAMBLE

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. A.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics,organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.


HOW IT WORKS

Rarely have we seen a person fail who has thoroughly followed our path. Those who do not recover are people who cannot or will not completely give themselves to this simple program, usually men and women who are constitutionally incapable of being honest with themselves. There are such unfortunates. They are not at fault; they seem to have been born that way. They are naturally incapable of grasping and developing a manner of living which demands rigorous honesty. Their chances are less than average. There are those too who suffer from grave emotional and mental disorders, but many of them do recover if they have the capacity to be honest.

Our stories disclose in a general way what we used to be like, what happened, and what we are like now. If you have decided you want what we have and are willing to go any length to get it - then you are ready to take certain steps. At some of these we balked. We thought we could find an easier, softer way. But we could not. With all the earnestness at our command, we beg of you to be fearless and thorough from the very start. Some of us have tried to hold onto our old ideas and the result was nil until we let go absolutely. Remember that we deal with alcohol -- cunning, baffling, powerful! Without help it is too much for us. But there is One who has all power--that One is God. May you find Him now! Half measures availed us nothing. We stood at the turning point. We asked His protection and care with complete abandon. Here are the steps we took, which are suggested as a program of recovery:

1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol--that our lives had become unmanageable.

2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

9. Made direct amends to such people whereever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Many of us exclaimed, "What an order! I can't go through with it." Do not be discouraged. No one among us has been able to maintain anything like perfect adherence to these principles. We are not saints. The point is, that we are willing to grow along spiritual lines. The principles we have set down are guides to progress. We claim spiritual progress rather than spiritual perfection.

Our description of the alcoholic, the chapter to the agnostic, and our personal adventures before and after make clear three pertinent ideas: (a) That we were alcoholic and could not manage our own lives. (b) That probably no human power could have relieved our alcoholism. (c) That God could and would if He were sought.

from: ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS(The Big Book) The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered From Alcoholism - Third Edition - New York, 1976. Chapter 5. Page 58 -60.


THE TWELVE TRADITIONS

Our AA experience has taught us that:

1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon AA unity.

2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority - a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.

3. The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking.

4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or AA as a whole.

5. Each group has but one primary purpose - to carry the message to the alcoholic who still suffers.

6. An AA group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the AA name to any related facility or outside enterprise, less problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.

7. Every AA group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.

8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.

9. AA as such ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.

10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues;hence the AA name ought never be drawn into public controversy.

11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.

12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities. 

from: ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS(The Big Book) The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered From Alcoholism - Third Edition - New York, 1976. Page 564


AA PROMISES

1. We are going to know a new freedom and a new happiness.

2. We will not regret the past nor wish to shut the door on it.

3/4. We will comprehend the word serenity and we will know peace.

5. No matter how far down the scale we have gone, we will see how our experience can benefit others.

6. That feeling of uselessness and self-pity will disappear.

7. We will lose interest in selfish things and gain interest in our fellows

8. Self-seeking will slip away.

9. Our whole attitude and outlook upon life will change

10. Fear of people and of economic insecurity will leave us.

11. We will intuitively know how to handle situations which used to baffle us.

12. We will suddenly realize that God is doing for us what we could not do for ourselves.

Are these extravagant promises? We think not. They are being fulfilled among us - sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. They will materialize if we work for them.

From Alcoholics Anonymous(The Big Book) - The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered from Alcoholism Third Edition / New York City, 1976. Page 83-84. 


SERENITY PRAYER

"God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.  Keep coming back.  It works if you work it."


OUR FATHER

"Our Father, Who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day, our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil, for Thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever and ever.  Amen "



AA SPONSORSHIP

WHAT IS SPONSORSHIP?

A A began with sponsorship. When Bill W. was only a few months sober, he was stricken with a powerful urge to drink. This thought came to him: "You need another alcoholic just as much as he needs you." Bill W. found Dr Bob, who had been trying desperately and unsuccessfully to stop drinking, and out of their common need, A.A. was born. Dr Bob in turn safeguarded his own sobriety by sponsoring countless other alcoholics. In AA the sponsor and sponsored meet as equals, just as Bill & Bob did. The process of sponsoring is this: An alcoholic who has made some progress in the recovery program shares his experience on a continuous, individual basis with another alcoholic who is attempting to attain or maintain sobriety through AA. We need constant & close support as we begin to "live sober" lives.

HOW IS A SPONSOR CHOSEN?

We select an AA member with whom we feel comfortable about sharing our struggles and ask him to be our sponsor. This is generally someone further along in recovery and willing to help others. A good sponsor probably should be at least 6 months away from his last drink - & should be enjoying their sobriety. Our sobriety is greatly strengthened when we give it away. Men should choose men as sponsors & women should choose women.

WHAT DOES A SPONSOR DO? The main activity of a sponsor is to help the newcomer to stay sober. They do this by sharing their own personal experience. They are not doctors or professionals. The sponsor will often suggest that the newcomer begin to work on the 12 steps of AA beginning with seeing that they are "powerless over alcohol" and that their lives are unmanageable. They can not stop drinking by their "own willpower". The sponsor encourages and helps the newcomer to attend many AA meetings and introduces them to other recovering alcoholics. They do not impose their personal views on the alcoholic. They may help the alcoholic understand triggers for their slips.

WHO CAN BE A SPONSOR?

An alcoholic that has remained sober for at least 6 months and has a desire to spend time and help a newcomer get started in AA and recovery. Generally it is someone who has worked through at least the first 5 steps of AA. They are volunteers who are not paid.

HOW DOES A SPONSOR HELP THE ALCOHOLIC?

They get together at least once a week, often before or after an AA meeting for tea and whenever there is a special need. The sponsor shares parts of their own story that will help the newcomer. The sponsor does not demand or control the newcomer. The single purpose is to help alcoholics with their drinking. It is not to develop social friendships and to do social things together. The sponsor does not lend money nor need to help the alcoholic to get a job. The sponsor does not impose their beliefs on the alcoholic.


AA SLOGANS & PRAYERS

ONE DAY AT A TIME
LET GO & LET GOD
I AM RESPONSIBLE
ONLY YOU CAN MAKE A DECISION TO BE SOBER
WE DO HAVE A CHOICE! / JUST DON'T PICK UP THE FIRST DRINK
KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID (KISS)
ONE GLASS IS TOO MUCH - ONE THOUSAND IS NOT ENOUGH!
ALCOHOLISM IS A DISEASE / ALCOHOLISM IS AN ILLNESS
THINK! THINK! THINK!
BUT FOR THE GRACE OF GOD GO I
TOLERANCE!
IF YOU SPOT IT - YOU GOT IT
AA IS LOVE
I AM NOT UNIQUE
RESENTMENTS HURT ME MOST
KEEP COMING BACK - IT WORKS IF YOU WORK IT
HALT = HUNGRY - ANGRY - LONELY - TIRED
THE 4 AA TOOS = TOO BUSY, TOO TIRED, TOO LAZY, TOO DRUNK TO ATTEND REGULARLY
I'M NOT OK, AND YOU'RE NOT OK, BUT THAT'S OK.
FIRST THINGS FIRST (SOBRIETY)
EASY DOES IT
LIVE AND LET LIVE

SERENITY PRAYER:

"GOD GRANT ME THE SERENITY
TO ACCEPT THE THINGS I CAN NOT CHANGE,
THE COURAGE TO CHANGE THE THINGS I CAN,
AND THE WISDOM TO KNOW THE DIFFERENCE"

THE LORD'S PRAYER:

"OUR FATHER IN HEAVEN,
HALLOWED BE YOUR NAME,
YOUR KINGDOM COME,
YOUR WILL BE DONE ON EARTH
AS IT IS IN HEAVEN. GIVE US TODAY
OUR DAILY BREAD.
FORGIVE US OUR DEBTS,
AS WE ALSO HAVE FORGIVEN OUR DEBTORS.
AND LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION,
BUT DELIVER US FROM THE EVIL ONE." 

    1.    Acceptance
    2.    Accepting My Alcoholism
    3.    Act As If
    4.    Action
    5.    Addictive Personality
    6.    Adversity
    7.    Agnostics (We Agnostics)
    8.    Amends Beyond “I’m Sorry”
    9.    Amends, Making Hard Amends
    10.    Anger
    11.    Anniversaries
    12.    Anonymity
    13.    Asking for Help
    14.    Attitude
    15.    Attraction not Promotion
    16.    Balance
    17.    Being Alone

   18.    Being Considerate of Others (in and out of AA)
    19.    Being Useful
    20.    Big Book (Using the Big Book)
    21.    Boredom with the Program
    22.    (The) Bottom is Where You Stop Digging (you hit bottom when you stop digging)
    23.    Breaking My Anonymity
    24.    Bring the Body and the Mind Will Follow
    25.    But For the Grace of God
    26.    Carry This Message
    27.    Change
    28.    Changing Routines, Changing People, Places and Things (to avoid drinking)
    29.    Character Defects
    30.    Choice
    31.    Clarity of Thought
    32.    Codependence
    33.    Compassion

   34.    Complacency
    35.    Completely Giving Myself to This Simple Program
    36.    Contempt Prior to Investigation
    37.    Courage
    38.    Courage to Change the Things I Can (Serenity Prayer)
    39.    Cravings
    40.    Cunning, Baffling, Powerful
    41.    Decision Making
    42.    Dealing with Difficult People
    43.    Denial
    44.    Dependence
    45.    Detaching, Detaching with Love
    46.    Disappointment
    47.    Discipline
    48.    Disease Concept
    49.    Do the Next Right Thing
    50.    (The) Doctor’s Opinion (from the Big Book)
    51.    Don’t Drink and Go To Meetings
    52.    Don’t Quit Before the Miracle
    53.    Drinking Occasions
    54.    (A) Drug is a Drug

    55.    Drugs (Problems Other Than Alcohol)

    56.    Drunk Who Brought You In Will Take You Out
    57.    Dry Drunks
    58.    Easy Does It
    59.    Economic Insecurity
    60.    Ego (ego-smashing, Easing God Out)
    61.    Eleventh Step Prayer (Prayer of Saint Francis of Assisi)
    62.    Emotional Balance (from Step 10)
    63.    Emotional Hangover (from Step 10)
    64.    Emotional Sobriety (Emotions)
    65.    Enjoying Life (Having Fun Sober)
    66.    Expect a Miracle
    67.    Expectations (Unreasonable Expectation, Pre-Planned Resentments)
    68.    Experience (Sharing Our Experience)
    69.    Experience, Strength and Hope
    70.    Faith
    71.    Fake It Till You Make It
    72.    (The) Family Afterwards
    73.    Fear
    74.    Fear of Failure/Fear of Success

   75.    Feelings and Emotions
    76.    Feeling Different
    77.    Fellowship
    78.    First Drink Gets You Drunk
    79.    First Things First
    80.    First Thought Wrong
    81.    Fixing Me, Not You
    82.    Forgiveness
    83.    Forgiving Others
    84.    Forgiving Ourselves
    85.    Foundation
    86.    Fourth Dimension (from page 25 in The Big Book)
    87.    Freedom
    88.    Freedom from Bondage
    89.    Friendship
    90.    Fun
    91.    Gift of Desperation
    92.    Gifts of the Program
    93.    God as I Understand Him
    94.    Gossip
    95.    Gratitude
    96.    Greed, Gluttony, Having Enough
    97.    Group Membership (belonging to a group, having a “home” group)
    98.    Growth
    99.    Growth through Pain
    100.    Guilt
    101.    Handling Failure
    102.    Handling Success
    103.    Happiness
    104.    Happy, Joyous and Free
    105.    Higher Power
    106.    Hitting Bottom
    107.    Holidays
    108.    Honesty (Rigorous Honesty)
    109.    Hope
    110.    How do you maintain your spiritual condition?
    111.    How do you work the steps?
    112.    How easy does it (working the program, staying sober) get?
    113.    Has has your concept of a higher power changed in sobriety?
    114.    How Have You Changed?
    115.    How Important Is It?
    116.    How it Works (Twelve Step Recovery)
    117.    Humility
    118.    Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired (HALT)
    119.    I Am Responsible
    120.    Identify, Don’t Compare
    121.    If God is in charge, why do we sweat the small stuff?
    122.    If it’s not practical, it’s not spiritual
    123.    If nothing changes, nothing changes
    124.    Improving the Quality of My Sobriety
    125.    Insanity
    126.    Insidious (Patiently Waiting for a Chance to Ensnare)
    127.    Instincts
    128.    Integrity
    129.    Inventory (Taking My Own)
    130.    Inventory (Taking That of Others)
    131.    Isolating
    132.    It Is What It Is
    133.    Jealousy
    134.    Joy, The Joy of Living
    135.    Keep Coming Back
    136.    Keep it Simple
    137.    Keeping it Green
    138.    Let Go and Let God
    139.    Letting Go (of Outcomes)
    140.    Letting Go (of the Past)
    141.    Letting Go (of People, Places and Things)
    142.    Life on Life’s Terms
    143.    Literature as a Tool (Using the Big Book, Twelve and Twelve, meditations, etc)
    144.    Live and Let Live
    145.    Living in the Real World
    146.    Living in the Moment, Living in the Present, Living in the Now
    147.    Living with Myself in Sobriety
    148.    Lonliness
    149.    Loss
    150.    Love
    151.    Maintaining Sobriety
    152.    Meditation
    153.    Meeting Makers Make It
    154.    Meetings
    155.    Mental, Spiritual and Physical Disease
    156.    Mental Illness (Problems Other Than Alcohol)
    157.    Moderation
    158.    Money
    159.    More will be Revealed
    160.    No Pain, No Gain
    161.    Nothing Changes if Nothing Changes
    162.    One Day at a Time
    163.    Online meetings
    164.    Organized Religion
    165.    Other Addictions
    166.    Pain
    167.    Pass it On
    168.    Patience
    169.    Pause when Agitated (Big Book page 87)
    170.    People Pleasing
    171.    Perceptions vs. Reality
    172.    Perseverance
    173.    Physical Illness (Problems Other Than Alcohol)
    174.    Powerlessness
    175.    Practicing These Principles in All Our Affairs
    176.    Prayer
    177.    Pride
    178.    Pride in Reverse
    179.    Primary Purpose/Singleness of Purpose
    180.    Principles Before Personalities
    181.    Priorities
    182.    Projection (Thinking About Outcomes that are in the Future, Good and Bad)
    183.    Progress, Not Perfection
    184.    Progression
    185.    Promises
    186.    Rationalization, minimizing and justifying, self-justification
    187.    Recovered or Recovering?
    188.    Recovery (Getting Better)
    189.    Regret (We Will Not Regret the Past, Promises)
    190.    Relapse
    191.    Relationships
    192.    Relaxing, Relaxation
    193.    Remember What You Would Have Settled For
    194.    Remembering Your Last Drunk
    195.    Remorse
    196.    Resentment
    197.    Resolutions
    198.    Responsibility
    199.    Restless, Irritable and Discontent (RID)
    200.    Restraint of Tongue and Pen
    201.    Rituals of Sobriety
    202.    Road Rage
    203.    Rule #62 (from Tradition Four)
    204.    Sanity
    205.    Secrets (You’re Only as Sick as Your Secrets or Your Secrets will get You Drunk)
    206.    Self Acceptance
    207.    Self-Centeredness
    208.    Self Esteem
    209.    Self Pity
    210.    Self Seeking
    211.    Self-Will
    212.    Selfishness
    213.    Serenity
    214.    Serenity Prayer
    215.    Serenity Prayer long form
    216.    Service
    217.    Sex
    218.    Sharing (talking or telling my story) at Meetings
    219.    Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired
    220.    Slips
    221.    Slogans
    222.    Sobriety Dates
    223.    Spiritual Awakening
    224.    Spiritual Axiom (from Step Ten, page 90, 12 and 12)
    225.    Spiritual Part of the Program
    226.    Spirituality
    227.    Sponsorship
    228.    Staying Away from the First Drink
    229.    Staying in the Now
    230.    Step One
    231.    Step Two
    232.    Step Three
    233.    Step Four
    234.    Step Five
    235.    Step Six
    236.    Step Seven
    237.    Step Eight
    238.    Step Nine
    239.    Step Ten
    240.    Step Eleven
    241.    Step Twelve
    242.    Stick with the Winners
    243.    Strength (Sharing Our Strength, What is Your Strength?)
    244.    Stress (Coping with Stress)
    245.    Suggestions (Taking the Suggestions)
    246.    Surrender
    247.    Taking Risks
    248.    Taking Things for Granted (before and after sobriety)
    249.    Telling on Yourself
    250.    “Terminal” Uniqueness – feeling unique can kill me
    251.    Think, Think, Think
    252.    This Too Shall Pass
    253.    Time (Time Takes Time)
    254.    To Thine Own Self Be True
    255.    Tolerance
    256.    Tools of the Program
    257.    Tradition One
    258.    Tradition Two
    259.    Tradition Three
    260.    Tradition Four
    261.    Tradition Five
    262.    Tradition Six
    263.    Tradition Seven
    264.    Tradition Eight
    265.    Tradition Nine
    266.    Tradition Ten
    267.    Tradition Eleven
    268.    Tradition Twelve
    269.    Triggers
    270.    Trust
    271.    Trust God, Clean House, Help Others
    272.    Turning it Over
    273.    Twelfth Step Calls (going to see someone who is asking for help and/or drinking)
    274.    Twenty-four Hours a Day (one hour, one minute at a time)
    275.    Unfinished Amends
    276.    Unmanageability
    277.    Using the Program Instead of Using Alcohol
    278.    Using the Telephone
    279.    Utilize Don’t Analyze
    280.    Wait to Worry
    281.    We are not a glum lot (from page 132 of the Big Book)
    282.    We of the Program
    283.    What Convinced You That You Had a Problem?
    284.    What is AA?
    285.    What do You do to Stay Sober?
    286.    What do you love about AA?
    287.    What have you gained from the program?
    288.    What outside forces keep you from drinking?
    289.    What Step are you on?
    290.    When others are drinking (and potentially dangerous, what do you do?)
    291.    Who supported you to get sober?  To stay sober?
    292.    Why Are You Here?
    293.    Why did you get sober?
    294.    Will power
    295.    Willing to go to Any Lengths
    296.    Willingness
    297.    Wisdom to Know the Difference (Serenity Prayer)
    298.    Wreckage of the Past
    299.    Yets


schedule:

January-March
Saturday  8 am       
Scott

Saturday  8 pm        Scott